The Pirates House

My new novel is set in Savannah, GA about 10 years in the future and I’ve made use of some of the more interesting local landmarks. The Pirate’s House makes an appearance as a boarded up abandoned building not as a popular tourist spot. In the dystopian future I’m creating where famine and deadly disease grip the populace, no one is concerned with vacation so much of the local economy has collapsed.

I have a scene where my group of heroes is looking for a way to escape to the Savannah River via an underground tunnel and they make their way to The Pirates House under the assumption that there may be an entrance to a secret tunnel there. Since the famous restaurant plays such an important part in my novel I thought it would be fun to write about it’s actual history here.

So when I think of the Pirate’s House the first word that comes to mind is “seafood” because I had a delicious Sea Bass there one Valentine’s Day. Other things that come to mind are “haunted” and “historic.”

The spot where the Pirate’s House now stands was originally the Trustees Garden, the first experimental garden in America. After the garden was no longer needed in 1753 the Pirate’s House was built to be an inn to house sailors as Savannah was then a bustling port town. The Pirate’s House became a favorite haunt for seaman and pirates but more happened at the inn than just drinking and dinning.

Sailors were known to have bee drugged, or possibly whacked on the head and drug through a brick tunnel that lead down to the Savannah River where a waiting ship would take them out to sea.

Charming, spooky great place to eat!

Charming, spooky great place to eat!

 

The sprawling restaurant has now operated for the last 30 years and boasts 15 dinning rooms; some of them famous for more than just food. Savannah makes the top list in USA Today’s “Most haunted cities in America” and if you look up places in Savannah that are said to be the most active, The Pirate’s House will be one of the first mentioned. People have reported hearing laughter from an unoccupied upstairs area of the restaurant. Some have claimed to have seen a ragged looking privateer in the Captain’s Room or a gruff sailor who glares and then disappears. Employees also claim that chairs tend to rearrange themselves.

Paranormal Ghost Hunters of North Georgia investigated the restaurant twice. The investigators didn’t find anything on their first visit but the second time they captured photos of strange orbs and ghostly voices on tape. Savannah has Hearse Tours and Walking Ghost Tours and anyone who participates will find themselves either driving by or walking through The Pirates House.

With such a rich and interesting history I had to give the restaurant a cameo appearance in my novel. I wonder if my heroes will find the underground tunnel? And if they do, I wonder what might be inside?

Retrieved from http://www.thepirateshouse.com

Moore, J. (November 14, 2012). America’s 10 Most Haunted Cities. Retrieved from http://www.usatoday.com.

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